Inside #MIM2018: “Zero Malaria Starts with Me” campaign showcases achievements and celebrates Senegal's successes in the malaria-fight on day 2 of the conference

The “Zero Malaria Starts with Me” national mobilization campaign to eliminate malaria has been a model of success since it was first launched in Senegal in 2014. Organizations around the world continue to laud the program, with H.E. Macky Sall, President of Senegal, receiving the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA) Award for Excellence for his outstanding leadership of the campaign, which helped the country reduce malaria cases by more than twenty percent between 2015-2016.

Now in its fourth year, “Zero Malaria” is ready to expand beyond the borders of Senegal, and take its innovative, inclusive approach to increasing awareness in the population at all levels of society, engaging the private sector, and making malaria elimination a priority at the the highest levels of government, to neighboring countries with the RBM Partnership to End Malaria.

On Monday, at a special luncheon during the 7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) conference, Speak Up Africa and its partners highlighted the achievements and opportunities of the campaign, as well as presented the plans for expansion.

 Pr. Awa Marie Coll-Seck Minister of State of Senegal, speaking about the "Zero Malaria Starts with Me" luncheon.

Pr. Awa Marie Coll-Seck Minister of State of Senegal, speaking about the "Zero Malaria Starts with Me" luncheon.

“We are delighted to hear about the campaign’s expansion throughout Africa and hope to further our activities with National Malaria Control Programmes throughout the continent,” said Kabirou Mbodje, CEO and Founder of Wari, an international digital platform, born in Africa and dedicated to financial inclusion. “By sponsoring several community-based and mass communication activities, we aim to improve awareness of malaria prevention in Senegal and on the continent.”

In its new expanded phase, the campaign will support African nations in their efforts towards malaria elimination through:

  • High-level engagement with government, private sector and civil society leaders: as part of the pan-African “Zero Malaria Starts with Me” campaign, leaders will be invited to publicly pledge their support to and make concrete commitments towards malaria elimination.
  • Advocating for an increase in external and domestic funding for malaria elimination: as part of the broader strategy of increasing the financial envelope for malaria, the campaign will explore innovative financial mechanisms and attract contributions from the private sector.
  • Increasing awareness and ownership at the community level: broad public engagement with a focus on youth, and development of a “community malaria champions” network will be a key element of the campaign.
  • Providing mission-critical support to malaria endemic countries: the campaign will support national malaria control programmes in their elimination efforts through the elaboration of a hands-on “Zero Malaria Starts with Me” toolkit and on-demand technical assistance.

During the luncheon, moderated by Ibrahima Cheikh Diong, CEO of ACT Africa Group, the importance of participation from all stakeholders–community citizens, researchers, health workers, national program managers, and government officials–was stressed.

 The three pillars of the "Zero Malaria Starts with Me" campaign represented in one photo: political commitment, community and private sector engagement. 

The three pillars of the "Zero Malaria Starts with Me" campaign represented in one photo: political commitment, community and private sector engagement. 

“We need strong political leadership across levels to ensure malaria elimination remains a top health and development priority. As we’ve seen in Senegal, strong government commitment is critical for advancing progress against malaria. However, cross-national political partnerships are also essential for sharing best practices and ensuring sustained success,” remarked Philip Welkhoff, Malaria Program Director at the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation.

AU member states, Ethiopia, Mozambique, Swaziland, Uganda, Zambia and Zimbabwe, have already expressed interest in the campaign, and the RBM Partnership continues to work closely with the AU Commission and other partners on developing the campaign ahead of a planned launch during the 31st African Union Summit in Mauritania in June.

To learn more about “Zero Malaria Starts with Me” visit http://www.zeropalu.org/ (French).

Inside #MIM2018: A wrap up of the first day on its return to Senegal twenty years later

Yesterday marked day one of the 7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM), the largest scientific conference focused on the global fight to eliminate malaria. Once again, twenty years after the first MIM conference, scientists, researchers, policymakers, and heads of state are meeting in Senegal, this time at the Abdou Diouf International Conference Center (CICAD), to promote global collaboration and build research capacity in malaria-endemic countries across Africa.

Taking advantage of the overwhelming presence of partners attending the conference, the  RBM Partnership to End Malaria board convened for a dialogue, where the newly released strategic plan was introduced and questions were answered regarding the way forward for the new board.

 RBM Partnership to End Malaria board members convene a dialogue before the opening ceremony of the 7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) on 15 April 2018.

RBM Partnership to End Malaria board members convene a dialogue before the opening ceremony of the 7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) on 15 April 2018.

After an introduction of board members by Board Chairperson Dr. Winnie Mpanju-Shumbusho, Senegal Minister of State, Prof. Awa Coll-Seck, welcomed the First Lady of Niger, H.E. Aïssata Issoufou, and reiterated the need for cross-border collaboration.

RBM CEO Dr. Kesete Admasu wrapped up the first part of the session with key points from the 2018-2020 strategy including three cross-cutting objectives:

  • Keep malaria high on political and developmental agendas;
  • Promote and support regional approaches;
  • Promote and advocate for sustainable malaria financing.

The dialogue concluded with questions from the audience, allowing an opportunity for all board members to contribute their inputs to the discussion, including Elhadj As Sy, Secretary General of the International Federation of Red Cross, who reminded the audience, “We will not eliminate #malaria if we do not address the situation of refugees in Myanmar or the issues in northern Nigeria.”

Dr. Pedro L. Alonso, Director of the World Health Organization’s Global Malaria Programme, also announced that three African countries, Ghana, Kenya and Malawi, will be part of the first rollout of the malaria vaccine, RTS,S, reminding participants that tangible innovations and advances are being made towards elimination.

Following the RBM dialogue session, the #MIM2018 opening ceremony was convened in the CICAD auditorium. Moderated by Ibrahima Cheikh Diong, Founder and Chief Executive Officer of Africa Consulting and Trading, highlights for the upcoming week were shared by Dr. Rose Leke, MIM Secretariat Director; Dr. Admasu; Prof. Omar Gaye, Chair of the MIM organizing committee and and Head of the Department of Parasitology of the Faculty of Medicine at Cheikh Anta Diop University; Dr. Magda Robalo, Director of Communicable Diseases at the World Health Organization’s Regional Office for Africa (WHO AFRO), who shared remarks from WHO AFRO Regional Director Dr. Matshidiso Moeti in her absence; and African Union Representative Mariama Cissé.

 Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Harold Varmus, on stage during the opening ceremony of the  7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) on 15 April 2018. Dr. Varmus’ plenary session, “The Spirit of Dakar” was the first for the week-long conference.

Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Harold Varmus, on stage during the opening ceremony of the  7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) on 15 April 2018. Dr. Varmus’ plenary session, “The Spirit of Dakar” was the first for the week-long conference.

Nobel Prize winner, Dr. Harold Varmus, who was part of the MIM founding committee in 1997, led the first plenary session, “The Spirit of Dakar”, sharing that the “one unifying issue and rallying cry across Africa” at that time was malaria, and underscoring the work of the Malaria Research and Training Center, in Bamako, Mali, led by scientists Yeya Touré and Ogobara Doumbo.                     

The Executive Secretary of the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA), Joy Phumaphi, used the ceremony as an opportunity to present Senegalese President, H.E. Macky Sall, with the ALMA Award for Excellence for his outstanding leadership in reducing malaria cases in Senegal by more than twenty percent between 2015-2016.

 Senegalese President, H.E. Macky Sall accepting the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA) Award for Excellence from ALMA Executive Secretary Joy Phumaphi during the #MIM2018 opening ceremony.

Senegalese President, H.E. Macky Sall accepting the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA) Award for Excellence from ALMA Executive Secretary Joy Phumaphi during the #MIM2018 opening ceremony.

"This reaffirmed commitment to building a malaria-free world underlines our common ambition to save lives and leverage human capital in order to strengthen our economies and ensure the well-being of our people, especially the most vulnerable. To reinforce our current gains and amplify results, the Government of Senegal progressively raised the budget allocated to health while creating a specific budget line to the malaria fight," he said, closing the ceremony.

The MIM conference, “Dakar II: Two Decades of Progress, Challenges and Perspectives in Ending Malaria”, will continue at the Abdou Diouf International Conference Center in Diamniadio, Senegal from 15-20 April. Focused on new research in malaria surveillance, diagnostics, drugs, vector control, vaccines and health systems, participants will discuss how these tools can be used to accelerate the fight against malaria, both globally and within sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, panel discussions, workshops and keynote speeches will discuss the tremendous progress made over the past two decades, as well as addressing the challenges to achieving complete elimination.

For more information on MIM, visit www.mim2018.org.
 

International Experts Convene in Dakar to Present Latest Innovations in the Fight Against Malaria

7th MIM Pan African Malaria Conference focuses on the latest research and combatting remaining obstacles in the effort to end malaria for good

DAKAR, SENEGAL (April 15, 2018) – Thousands of researchers, experts and government officials from more than 70 countries gathered today for the launch of the 7th Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) Pan African Malaria Conference, April 15-20, the largest scientific conference focusing on the global fight to eliminate malaria.

The conference, “Dakar II: Two Decades of Progress, Challenges and Perspectives in Ending Malaria,” will focus on new research in malaria surveillance, diagnostics, drugs, vector control, vaccines and health systems, and will discuss how these tools can be used to accelerate the fight against malaria, both globally and within sub-Saharan Africa. In addition, panel discussions, workshops and keynote speeches will discuss the tremendous progress made over the past two decades, as well as addressing the challenges to achieving complete elimination.

Among the speakers will be Nobel Prize winner Prof. Harold Varmus; Dr. Matshidiso Moeti, Regional Director of the World Health Organization (WHO) Regional Office for Africa; Dr. Pedro Alonso, Head of the WHO Global Malaria Programme; Dr. Kesete Admasu, CEO of the RBM Partnership and the former Minister of Health of Ethiopia; and H.E. Amira El Fadil, African Union Commissioner for Social Affairs.

At the conference’s opening ceremony today, Senegalese President Macky Sall accepted the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA) Award for Excellence for his outstanding leadership in reducing malaria cases in Senegal by more than 20 percent between 2015 and 2016. Exemplifying what’s needed to stay committed on the path to a malaria-free Africa, President Sall focused on the urgent need to develop new tools and redouble efforts to advance the fight against this preventable disease.

"This reaffirmed commitment to building a malaria-free world underlines our common ambition to save lives and leverage human capital in order to strengthen our economies and ensure the well-being of our people, especially the most vulnerable. To reinforce our current gains and amplify results, the Government of Senegal progressively raised the budget allocated to health while creating a specific budget line to the malaria fight." said President Sall.

A wide array of innovative new tools and solutions will be presented at the conference, including the first-ever malaria vaccine, RTS,S, which will be rolled out later this year in parts of Ghana, Kenya and Malawi. Other topics to be discussed include the launch of an online database to address insecticide resistance, the impact of intermittent preventive therapy of malaria in pregnancy, preventing the disease through seasonal malaria chemoprevention, eliminating mosquitos through genetic engineering and addressing malaria transmitted through blood transfusions.

“Defeating malaria will require a coordinated, multipronged approach that brings together the resources, knowledge and expertise of individuals and institutions from a range of sectors,” said Dr. Kesete Admasu, CEO of the RBM Partnership to End Malaria. “The expertise and focus represented at this conference are critical for accelerating progress against a stalled agenda.”

The advances over the past 20 years have put the world on a path to ending malaria for good.  While this progress is commendable, the 2017 World Malaria Report demonstrates that it has stalled and is fragile and uneven. In 2016, there were an estimated 216 million cases of malaria, about 5 million more than in 2015, and 90 percent of these cases occurred in sub-Saharan Africa. Of the 445,000 people who died of the disease, about two-thirds were children under the age of 5. Yet, the number of countries reporting fewer than 10,000 cases was at its highest in 2016, showing that with determination, prioritization and the right tools, elimination is possible.

“The development of new, innovative tools to fight malaria is absolutely essential,” said Prof. Omar Gaye, Chair of the MIM organizing committee and Head of the Department of Parasitology of the Faculty of Medicine of Cheikh Anta Diop University, which is hosting the conference. “With insecticide and drug resistance becoming an increasingly urgent threat, we must act quickly to regain the momentum we have achieved over the past 15 years and accelerate progress toward ending the disease. That means greater emphasis on prevention strategies, improved research and clinical study approaches, and increased funding.”

The conference is being held a week ahead of World Malaria Day, which takes place on April 25 each year. It is also running parallel to the London Malaria Summit, which takes place alongside the Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in London on April 18. This meeting will bring together high-level stakeholders, including business leaders, philanthropists, scientists, heads of state and members of civil society to announce significant new commitments to mobilize domestic resources, increase investment, and develop new innovations and approaches toward beating malaria.

About the Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM):

The Multilateral Initiative on Malaria (MIM) was established in 1997 with the mission to strengthen and sustain, through collaborative research and training, the capacity of malaria-endemic countries in Africa to carry out the research that is required to develop and improve tools for malaria control and to strengthen the research-control interface. Every four years, the MIM organizes a Pan African Malaria Conference to celebrate progress made by researchers and control program managers. The MIM Secretariat is based at the University of Yaoundé I in Cameroon, with Prof. Rose Leke as co-chair, Prof. Wilfred Mbacham as executive director, and Dr. Abanda Ngu Njei as manager. For this 7th MIM conference, the Local Organizing Committee is chaired by Prof. Omar Gaye and co-organized by Speak Up Africa.

Speak Up Africa joins forces with Special Olympics Senegal to provide menstrual hygiene management training for athletic coaches

Speak Up Africa and Special Olympics Senegal are long time partners in the fight against malaria, immunization awareness and breaking taboos around menstrual hygiene management (MHM).

Last week, at the Speak Up Africa Lab in Pikine, Senegal, the two organizations joined forces again for a training that prepared 19 Special Olympic coaches, from regions across Senegal, with the skills they will need to facilitate MHM awareness activities for people living with intellectual disabilities.

 Coaches from Special Olympics Senegal participate in a menstrual health management (MHM) training on 5 April 2018 at the Speak Up Africa Lab in Pikine, Senegal. The workshop prepares the women to lead their own MHM awareness activities for people living with intellectual disabilities.

Coaches from Special Olympics Senegal participate in a menstrual health management (MHM) training on 5 April 2018 at the Speak Up Africa Lab in Pikine, Senegal. The workshop prepares the women to lead their own MHM awareness activities for people living with intellectual disabilities.

Lead by Speak Up Africa Gender Expert Consultant Selly Ba, and Sanitation Program Officer Sophie Diop, the day-long workshop was broken into three modules covering:

  • The concepts of gender and equity, where participants were encouraged to share their thoughts on the topic;
  •  Health and menstrual hygiene including the biological aspects of menstruation;
  • Use and diversity of feminine hygiene products with a demonstration.

At the conclusion of the workshop, coaches received workshop materials, which they will use to conduct their own MHM trainings for Special Olympic athletes, and stressed the need for ongoing collaboration in providing solutions that meet the needs of young people with intellectual disabilities.

 During the workshop, Sophie Diop, Speak Up Africa’s Sanitation Program Officer, leads participants in a demonstration of various feminine hygiene products.

During the workshop, Sophie Diop, Speak Up Africa’s Sanitation Program Officer, leads participants in a demonstration of various feminine hygiene products.

Special Olympics Senegal is part of a global movement of people creating a new world of inclusion and community, using sports to help people with intellectual disabilities discover new skills, confidence and fulfillment. Working to spread compassion and tolerance, the international organization provides a wide range of training programs, competitions, medical examinations and fundraising events that focus on changing attitudes and supporting athletes.

Speak Up Africa’s “No Taboo Periods” campaign aims to positively impact and change perceptions around MHM, targeting national policies and decision makers in health, environment, water and sanitation. Workshops have been delivered in Senegal, and in Freetown, by special request of H.E. Sia Nyama Koroma, the First Lady of Sierra Leone.

How a Little Innovation and Determination Helped One Community in Senegal Reach Zero Malaria-related Deaths

The community of Thiénaba, 180 km from Dakar, Senegal’s capital city, has not had a malaria-related death since 2009. Prior to this, malaria was wreaking havoc in the community, including Ami Diop, a 12-year-old girl, who passed away in October 1999 after a two day sickness with fever.  

Ami’s father, El Hadj Diop, devastated by the loss of his daughter, decided something had to be done to prevent other families from experiencing the tragedy of this preventable disease. He formed Association Islamique Sopey Mohamed (AISM), which became the town’s main source of education on stopping malaria. Twenty years later, persistence and communal responsibility have become the simple, yet innovative solution to Thiénaba’s malaria challenge.

Now reaching as many as 73 neighboring towns and villages, the association has developed a successful method for beating malaria that includes providing everyone–man, woman and child–with knowledge on preventing and detecting malaria.

 Pr. Awa Marie Coll-Seck, Senegal's Minister of State and El Hadj Diop, President of the Association Islamique Sopey Mohamed (AISM).

Pr. Awa Marie Coll-Seck, Senegal's Minister of State and El Hadj Diop, President of the Association Islamique Sopey Mohamed (AISM).

In addition to educating the community, association members also conduct surprise home visits to ensure everyone is sleeping under insecticide-treated mosquito nets every night. If members find nets are not being used, families are fined 250 FCFA (about $0.50), which goes into a community fund. It has been several years since anyone has been fined.

The association also organizes “set settal” days, where everyone comes together to keep the community clean, making sure to drain stagnant water and diminishing places mosquitoes can breed.

This week, the efforts of El Hadj, AISM and the entire community of Thiénaba were celebrated with the inauguration of a new community center and office space for AISM. On hand to celebrate their accomplishments were Prof. Awa Marie Coll Seck, Senegal’s Minister of State and RBM Partnership to End Malaria Board Member. “When we put our mind to it, we can effectively control malaria and even eliminate it once and for all here in Senegal and beyond,” remarked Prof. Coll Seck.

The town of Thiénaba and El Hadj are becoming international examples of how the smallest of actions can have the biggest impact on transforming lives. Such examples have inspired the national mobilization campaign Zero Malaria Starts with Me. Launched in 2014, the campaign is a movement aimed at increasing awareness, prioritization and commitment of the entire country towards the elimination of malaria. After close to four years of implementation in Senegal, the campaign will be scaled up to neighboring countries as cross-border collaboration is key to putting an end to malaria on the continent.

Learn more about El Hadj's story here and the Zero Malaria Starts with Me campaign here.

Tous pour la vaccination et contre le paludisme pour construire l’avenir de nos enfants !

Cette semaine, Speak Up Africa a participé à une conférence sur le thème « Construisons ensemble l’avenir de nos enfants : Prévention par la vaccination et la lutte contre le paludisme » organisée par Special Olympics en collaboration avec l’Ecole Nationale des Travailleurs Sociaux Spécialisés et animée par le Dr Boubacar Signaté, Medecin urgentiste à SOS Médecin.

Cette initiative fait suite à la collecte des informations réalisée par les Coachs de Special Olympics au niveau des ménages des athlètes dans le cadre d’une enquête qui a montré un faible taux de couverture vaccinale chez les enfants vivant avec une déficience mentale.

La conférence a regroupé près de 150 parents d’athlètes et de 25 Coachs encadreurs de Special Olympics et fut relevée par la participation du Ministère de la jeunesse et de la Direction Générale de l’Action Sociale.

 Avec une approche basée sur le droit des enfants à la santé, le conférencier est revenu sur l’importance de la prévention en rappelant aux parents qu’ils ont le devoir de respecter le droit de leurs enfants à la santé et que la vaccination constitue un allié sûr à cet effet. Il a aussi fait la liaison entre la santé des enfants et la productivité des parents et l’utilisation des ressources familiales avant de finir par répondre aux questions des participants.

Concernant le paludisme, l’accent a été mis sur l’utilisation des moyens essentiels de prévention. En invitant les parents à veiller à ce que tous les membres de la famille dorment sous moustiquaire imprégnée toutes la nuit et cela pendant toute l’année et à éliminer tous les gites larvaires autour des ménages.

A l’issue des échanges, une distribution des livrets sur le paludisme, des livrets sur la vaccination et des bracelets anti moustiques ont été offerts aux athlètes de Special Olympics.

La rencontre s’est terminée sur une note d’espoir pour les parents d’athlètes avec l’engagement du chef service régionale de l’Action Sociale de Dakar à porter le plaidoyer afin de faire bénéficier aux familles des athlètes détenteurs de la carte d’égalité des chances une bourse familiale.

On International Women’s Day, Speak Up Africa partners with Apiafrique to deliver menstrual hygiene management workshop for high school students

On International Women’s Day, Speak Up Africa partners with Apiafrique to deliver menstrual hygiene management workshop for high school students in the Thies region of Senegal

Openly approaching subjects long thought to be cultural taboo is not always an easy task. However, advocating for a better understanding of menstrual hygiene is one commitment Speak Up Africa is dedicated to improving with its campaign “No Taboo Periods”.

Partnering with Apiafrique, a Dakar-based social enterprise that produces environment-friendly feminine hygiene products, Speak Up Africa facilitated a workshop for students at a Ngaparou high school as part of the school’s International Women’s Day activities on 8 March 2018.

   Students at Ngaparou high school gather for menstrual hygiene management (MHM) workshop. Conducted in partnership with Speak Up Africa and Apiafrique, the workshop is part of the “No Taboo Periods” campaign that advocates for improving practices around menstrual hygiene within communities.

Students at Ngaparou high school gather for menstrual hygiene management (MHM) workshop. Conducted in partnership with Speak Up Africa and Apiafrique, the workshop is part of the “No Taboo Periods” campaign that advocates for improving practices around menstrual hygiene within communities.

With boys, girls and teaching staff present, Speak Up Africa’s gender specialist Selly Ba opened the workshop by explaining the differences in male and female reproductive systems, detailing how the body changes over time for both. Initially full of giggles, the students grew quiet and attentive as Selly continued her presentation with an introduction to menstruation and the natural process the female body goes through monthly.

Teaching tools developed by Speak Up Africa were used to illustrate the care and use of various feminine hygiene products, including a reusable sanitary pad developed and manufactured in Senegal by Apiafrique. To close the workshop, Apiafrique’s Marina Gning (CEO) and Fatoumata Aidara (Marketing Manager), joined Selly in quizzing students on what they learned during the morning, and later answered questions from all the students.

In addition to the morning workshop, a smaller training session was conducted for 25 students who would become advocates for menstrual hygiene management (MHM), answering questions and teaching their peers about the importance of MHM.

  Selly Ba (left), a gender specialist with Speak Up Africa, and Marina Gning (right), CEO of Apiafrique, demonstrate how to use feminine hygiene products, including a reusable sanitary pad manufactured by Apiafrique, during a menstrual hygiene management (MHM) workshop at a high school in Ngaparou, Senegal. Conducted in partnership with Speak Up Africa and Apiafrique, the workshop is part of the “No Taboo Periods” campaign that advocates for improving practices around menstrual hygiene within communities.

Selly Ba (left), a gender specialist with Speak Up Africa, and Marina Gning (right), CEO of Apiafrique, demonstrate how to use feminine hygiene products, including a reusable sanitary pad manufactured by Apiafrique, during a menstrual hygiene management (MHM) workshop at a high school in Ngaparou, Senegal. Conducted in partnership with Speak Up Africa and Apiafrique, the workshop is part of the “No Taboo Periods” campaign that advocates for improving practices around menstrual hygiene within communities.

Largely neglected by the water, sanitation and hygiene (WASH) sector, and still not fully considered in public policy, menstrual hygiene continues to pose challenges for women and girls globally. Throughout Africa, women and girls are often thought of as impure during menstrual cycles, and face societal exclusion, as well as a lack of adequate sanitation infrastructure in schools and homes.

In sub-Saharan Africa, one girl out of ten does not go to school during her menstrual cycle, amounting to an approximate 20% lost in school time over the course of a year. However, addressing menstrual hygiene properly and helping communities eliminate the shame associated with menstruation can lead to health, environment and economic gains for everyone.

Speak Up Africa uses it’s “No Taboo Periods” campaign as a tool to positively impact and change perceptions around MHM. Targeting national policies and decision makers in health, environment, water and sanitation, workshops have been delivered in Senegal, and in Freetown, by special request of H.E. Sia Nyama Koroma, the First Lady of Sierra Leone.

Rencontre des partenaires de l’Office National d’Assainissement du Sénégal (ONAS) intervenant dans le secteur de l’assainissement autonome

ASSAINISSEMENT AUTONOME ET DÉLÉGATION DE SERVICE PUBLIC, QUELLE APPROCHE POUR ATTEINDRE LES OBJECTIFS DE DÉVELOPPEMENT DURABLE ?

L’accès à un système d’assainissement adéquat est un droit humain, au même titre que le droit à l’éducation ou à la santé. Pourtant à ce jour, en Afrique de l’Ouest, 75% de la population n’a toujours pas accès à un système d’assainissement adéquat. Cette situation se traduit par une production considérable de boues de vidange déversées, la plupart du temps, sans traitement dans l’environnement, dégradant ainsi considérablement l’environnement et la santé des populations. De plus, une mauvaise prise en compte des questions d’assainissement est un frein majeur au développement économique, sanitaire et social pour tout pays en développement.

Pour remédier à ce problème, l’Office National de l’Assainissement du Sénégal (ONAS) a mis en place en 2011, avec l’appui financier de la Fondation Bill et Melinda Gates, le Programme de structuration du marché de boues de vidange (PSMBV). Le Programme qui prend fin le 31 mars 2018, a pour objectif principal d’organiser le marché des boues de vidange de Dakar, afin d’offrir un cadre de vie décent aux ménages démunis en leur assurant l’accès à des installations d’assainissement et des services de vidange mécanique de meilleure qualité et à des prix abordables.

Après sept ans de mise en œuvre, le projet passe à l’échelle avec une emphase sur la forte implication du secteur privé. L’assainissement autonome est un des piliers essentiels à l’atteinte des Objectifs de Développement Durable (ODD). L’ODD 6.2 vise à assurer l’accès de tous, dans des conditions équitables, à des services d’assainissement et d’hygiène adéquats et à mettre fin à la défécation en plein air, en accordant une attention particulière aux besoins des femmes et des filles et des personnes en situation vulnérable.

Alors que le PSMBV s’est jusqu’ici cantonné à organiser le marché des boues de vidange au niveau de Dakar, le programme de délégation de service de l’assainissement autonome de l’ONAS (DS2A) sera implanté dans plusieurs autres villes du Sénégal. A travers cette nouvelle approche, l’ONAS vise à prendre en charge toute la chaîne de valeur des boues de vidange.

Convaincu de la rentabilité du secteur de l’assainissement autonome, l’ONAS a organisé, ce jeudi 1 mars 2018 de 9h00 à 15h00 à l’Hôtel Radisson Blu de Dakar, une table ronde. Cette table ronde a réuni une soixantaine de participants des secteurs public et privé ainsi que ses partenaires techniques et financiers. Cette rencontre a permis d’exposer et d’expliquer les perspectives et opportunités de la mise à l’échelle des efforts de régulation du secteur, à impliquer le secteur privé et tous les acteurs pour enfin assurer la pérennité des progrès en matière d’accès à l’assainissement au Sénégal.

Il est essentiellement ressorti de cet atelier que, l’investissement du secteur privé dans l’assainissement autonome est un élément déterminant pour l’atteinte de l’ODD 6, car l’Etat, à lui seul, ne dispose pas des moyens financiers et techniques pour y parvenir. Cette option est incontournable pour d’une part assurer la durabilité des ouvrages et d’autre part offrir aux usagers un service de qualité. Cette approche nécessite une implication des partenaires techniques et financiers et un appui financier et organisationnel du secteur privé. Comme souligné par le Directeur Général de l’ONAS M. Lansana Gagny Sakho « Nous devons plus parler de secteur privé mais de partenaires ».

La vision de l’ONAS consiste à faire une délégation de service de l’assainissement tout le long de la chaine de valeur assainissement en confiant des périmètres de délégation à des acteurs du secteur privé financièrement rentable. Ces acteurs du secteur privé à travers la Directrice générale de Delta SA se sont engagés à « appliquer la vision de l’ONAS, et souhaite être impliquée sur toute la chaine de valeur du secteur de l’assainissement : de la gestion domiciliaire à la valorisation des sous-produits issus de l’assainissement. »

Le congrès international de l’Association africaine de l’eau

Le congrès international de l’Association africaine de l’eau

Un moment de partage et d’échange sur les modèles d’assainissement innovants et rentables

Du 11 au 16 février 2018 s’est tenu à Bamako le 19ème Congrès international de l’Association africaine de l’eau où plus de 1500 participants se sont réunis autour de la thématique « Accélérer l’accès à l’assainissement et à l’eau pour tous, face aux défis du changement climatique ». Tous les deux ans, ce forum scientifique et technique fait l’état des lieux du développement du secteur de l’eau, de l’assainissement et de l’environnement en Afrique.  Cette année, ce congrès a vu la forte participation du Sénégal matérialisée par la présence d’une forte délégation avec à sa tête, le Ministre de l’Hydraulique et de l’Assainissement, M. Mansour Faye. Lors de ce congrès, une attention particulière a été accordée au secteur de l’assainissement, notamment l’assainissement autonome, qui apparaît comme un sous-secteur socialement accepté et économique rentable.

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David Beckham Launches Malaria Must Die – A global Campaign Calling for New Commitments to End the World’s Oldest Disease

David Beckham Launches Malaria Must Die – A global Campaign Calling for New Commitments to End the World’s Oldest Disease

7 February, London – David Beckham today launched an ambitious new global malaria campaign, Malaria Must DieSo Millions Can Live calling upon leaders to “unite and fight” malaria. The campaign’s first focus is on leaders at the upcoming Commonwealth Heads of Government Meeting (CHOGM) in London in 70 days’ time.

The ground-breaking film, made by Ridley Scott Associates working with digital ad agency R/GA and Director Baillie Walsh, alongside input from Richard Curtis, features David in a glass box “under attack” by a swarm of mosquitoes. 

This dramatic film makes the point that, like David, those of us living in malaria-free countries are fortunate to be protected from the deadly disease, but half of the world’s population are still at risk. Malaria tragically claims 445,000 lives a year and over half of these deaths occur in Commonwealth countries. Each death is needless as malaria is totally preventable and costs less than a cup of tea to treat.

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Six African Countries Lead the Way to a Malaria-Free Africa by 2030.

Six African Countries Lead the Way to a Malaria-Free Africa by 2030.

Algeria, Comoros, Madagascar, the Gambia, Senegal, and Zimbabwe recognized by the African Leaders Malaria Alliance for their sharp decline in malaria cases.

Addis Ababa, Ethiopia (29 January 2018) – During the 30th African Union Summit, the African Leaders Malaria Alliance (ALMA) honored six African countries for their exemplary leadership in driving down malaria cases, even as regional and global progress risks losing momentum. The 2018 ALMA Awards for Excellence were presented to the heads of state of the following countries:

  • Madagascar, the Gambia, Senegal and Zimbabwe for: reducing malaria cases by more than 20 percent from 2015 to 2016
  • Algeria and Comoros for: being on-track to achieve a more than 40 percent drop incases by 2020

    ALMA is an alliance of 49 African countries working to end malaria on the continent by 2030. The ALMA Scorecard for Accountability & Action tracks progress and drives action on malaria control and elimination, and are chosen by an independent committee of experts in health, academia, and the private sector.
    While malaria deaths have plunged by more than 60 percent since 2000, cases rose in a majority of African countries in 2016, signaling that years of progress are at risk of stalling.
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L’assainissement autonome : une solution de choix de l’État du Sénégal.

L’assainissement autonome : une solution de choix de l’État du Sénégal.

Les partenaires de la Fondation Bill et Melinda Gates œuvrant pour le plaidoyer en faveur de l’assainissement autonome en visite à Dakar

L’accès à un assainissement adéquat est une question de dignité. Cette dernière demeure une priorité pour la préservation de la santé publique et la protection des milieux naturels contribuant ainsi au développement économique et social.

Conscient de ces enjeux, l’Office National d’Assainissement du Sénégal (ONAS), a lancé en 2011, avec l’appui financier de la Fondation Bill et Melinda Gates, le Programme de Structuration du Marché des Boues de Vidange[1] (PSMBV) dans les zones péri-urbaines de Dakar, pour une amélioration des conditions d’assainissement des populations. Ce programme conçu pour prendre en charge toute la chaîne de valeur des boues de vidanges a permis de mettre en exergue la vision du Président de la République son Excellence M. Macky Sall, matérialisée dans le Plan Sénégal Emergent (PSE) et visant à conduire le Sénégal sur la voie de l’émergence à l’horizon 2035.

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APPEL A MANIFESTATION D’INTERET POUR LA REALISATION D’UNE ANALYSE SITUATIONNELLE

APPEL A MANIFESTATION D’INTERET POUR LA REALISATION D’UNE ANALYSE SITUATIONNELLE

Commanditaire: Speak Up Africa (SUA)

Basée à Dakar, au Sénégal, Speak Up Africa est une organisation à but non lucratif de communication stratégique et de plaidoyer dédiée à catalyser le leadership africain, favoriser les changements de politiques et renforcer la sensibilisation autour du développement durable en Afrique.

Contexte de l’étude :

L’assainissement autonome constitue le système le plus répandu en Afrique de l’Ouest pour la gestion des eaux usées domestiques. Dans les villes d’Afrique, en particulier celles d’Afrique subsaharienne, la majeure partie des habitations ne sont pas raccordées à un réseau d’égout, mais sont équipées de systèmes autonomes comme les latrines traditionnelles ou latrines à fosses étanches. Certaines habitations ne disposent d’aucun système d’assainissement. Il est estimé que seuls 30% des pays d’Afrique subsaharienne ont un système d’assainissement adéquat. Cette situation se traduit par des pratiques d’assainissement souvent néfastes à la santé des populations. Mal gérés, les excréta constituent une source des maladies multipliant les risques de diarrhées, de fièvre typhoïde ou de dysenterie parmi les populations.

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Conférence de presse de la 7ème édition de l'Initiative Multilatérale sur le PaludismeConférence de presse de la 7ème édition de l'Initiative Multilatérale sur le Paludisme.

Conférence de presse de la 7ème édition de l'Initiative Multilatérale sur le PaludismeConférence de presse de la 7ème édition de l'Initiative Multilatérale sur le Paludisme.

L'Initiative Multilatérale sur le Paludisme (MIM) est une alliance d'organisations et de personnes concernées par la recherche et le contrôle du paludisme en Afrique fondée à Dakar en 1998. Le MIM vise à promouvoir la collaboration mondiale et à renforcer les capacités de recherche dans les pays endémiques du paludisme en Afrique nécessaires pour développer des outils et des politiques de lutte contre le paludisme.

Tous les 3 à 4 ans, le Secrétariat du MIM, en collaboration avec un groupe d'institutions basées en Afrique, organise la Conférence Panafricaine sur le Paludisme.

Vingt ans après la première édition, la Conférence MIM revient en terre sénégalaise grâce à une forte mobilisation de la communauté internationale et une volonté avérée de tenir la Conférence à nouveau en terre francophone.

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Ending Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Gateway to Universal Health Coverage.

Ending Neglected Tropical Diseases: A Gateway to Universal Health Coverage.

Today is a big day for the public health community! Today marks the launch of the 5th progress report and scorecard of the London Declaration on Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTDs)!

A perfect opportunity to highlight the results achieved to date thanks to a dynamic partnership composed of philanthropic organizations, private sector companies and key intergovernmental organizations like the World Health Organization (WHO). Together, we made great strides in reducing the burden caused by NTDs throughout the world. In 2011, just under 2 billion people required interventions against NTDs. This figure dropped to 1.5 billion in 2016, representing a decrease of over 400 million who no longer require preventive chemotherapy. In 2016 alone, more than one billion people, in the world’s poorest countries were treated for at least one NTD. That’s one in seven of the world’s population who received treatment!

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Growing Gap in Global Malaria Efforts Calls for Renewed Leadership.

Growing Gap in Global Malaria Efforts Calls for Renewed Leadership.

Tremendous gains reducing malaria cases and deaths since 2000 now in jeopardy. Nigeria, DRC and Rwanda top the list of high-burden countries, while Sri Lanka, Senegal and Madagascar show success is possible

Geneva (29 November 2017)  Unprecedented global progress in fighting malaria since 2000 is at stake unless countries redouble their efforts, according to the latest figures released by the World Health Organization (WHO) today.

The World Malaria Report 2017 shows fragile and uneven progress in global efforts against malaria, an entirely preventable and treatable disease, which puts half the world’s population at risk and costs a child’s life every two minutes.

According to the report, malaria-related cases and deaths worldwide stand at 216 million and 440,000 respectively, a flatline in the tremendous gains of the past 16 years in the fight against malaria. The report sends a clear warning that progress could be in jeopardy and resurgence is on the rise.

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Universal access to sanitation, a human right recognized by the United Nations since 2010.

Universal access to sanitation, a human right recognized by the United Nations since 2010.

"4.5 billion people around the world still do not have access to improved sanitation services in 2017. Sanitation remains a major challenge around the world knowing that 80% of the world’s wastewater is released daily into the environment with no appropriate treatment. As November 19 marked World Toilet Day, Speak Up Africa would like to take this perfect opportunity to highlight the work of Ms. Lena Tall Faye, one of the very few women leading incredible work on sanitation in Senegal.” 

For Lena Tall Faye, Sanitation Isn’t Just a Business, It’s a Calling

As a young girl growing up in the Sine Saloum region of Senegal, Lena Tall Faye experienced first-hand the indignities and dangers of being without safe sanitation. Like most women and girls in Africa, Lena was responsible for maintaining the family’s rudimentary facilities and ensuring good hygiene as best she could. When the manual emptier showed up to dispose of her village’s waste, she and her seven siblings knew how important it was to stay away. They understood that severe illnesses could arise from exposure to that waste, which could be devastating to their family.

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We're looking for a Consultant to Develop an Advocacy Guide for NTDs Control and Elimination!

We're looking for a Consultant to Develop an Advocacy Guide for NTDs Control and Elimination!

About Speak Up Africa:

Headquartered in Dakar, Senegal, Speak Up Africa is a communications and advocacy organization dedicated to catalyzing leadership, enabling policy change, and increasing awareness for sustainable development in Africa.

The success of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) has infused the continent with a new sense of vibrancy - from commercial promise to population increasingly connected - Africa’s pulse has quickened. In the new era of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), Speak Up Africa strives to promote a shift in African leadership and accountability and create an enabling environment for sustainable change.

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Signature par l’Association des maires du Sénégal (AMS) du « Pacte d’engagement pour l’élimination du paludisme au Sénégal »

Signature par l’Association des maires du Sénégal (AMS) du « Pacte d’engagement pour l’élimination du paludisme au Sénégal »

Communiqué de presse - Entre 2001 et 2013, la forte intensification des interventions de lutte antipaludique a contribué à réduire l’incidence mondiale de 30 % et à faire reculer de 47 % le taux de mortalité au niveau mondial, évitant ainsi, selon les estimations, 4,3 millions de décès. Aussi, dans la région Afrique de l’OMS, ce taux a baissé de 58 % chez les enfants de moins de 5 ans.

Conformément à la vision du plan mondial de lutte contre le paludisme et aux directives de l’Organisation Mondiale de la Santé (OMS), le Sénégal a mis à l’échelle les interventions à efficacité prouvée pour avoir un impact significatif et durable sur la morbidité et la mortalité palustres.

En effet, on observe une baisse en 2015 de plus de 65% des cas et de plus de 70% des décès dus au paludisme par rapport à 2000  et entre 2009 et 2015, la prévalence parasitaire est passée de 3% à 1,2%.

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Global fight against neglected tropical diseases hits one billion milestone.

Global fight against neglected tropical diseases hits one billion milestone.

International NGO Sightsavers and partners have taken one step closer to reaching the elimination of neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) as they celebrate hitting an historic milestone - the delivery of their cumulative one billionth supported treatment to people affected by these painful and poverty-trapping infections.

The billionth treatment was administered today (Thursday 16th November) to a seven-year-old girl named Dorcas, who was at risk of NTDs in Kudaru, a community in Kaduna State, Nigeria. It was a combined treatment for onchocerciasis (river blindness) and lymphatic filariasis (LF) as part of one of Sightsavers flagship programmes, UNITED, which is funded by UK aid. She received this treatment alongside her grandfather, Simon, made blind from river blindness decades before.

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